"I love sleep. My life has the tendency to fall apart when I’m awake, you know?"

Ernest Hemingway (via feellng)

(via shewalksinmydreams)

"I read so I can live more than one life in more than one place."

Anne Tyler (via realizes)

(via shewalksinmydreams)

quietspacecomics:

QSC- The first man on Mars

quietspacecomics:

QSC- The first man on Mars

(via scienceetfiction)

shewalksinmydreams:

kkklo:

Medieval Architecture - Edinburgh, Scotland. Complex roof tops and stonework.

Oh this is gorgeous

shewalksinmydreams:

kkklo:

Medieval Architecture - Edinburgh, Scotland. Complex roof tops and stonework.

Oh this is gorgeous

bethechangeyouwant:

little-audrey:

comfortspringstation:

Blow your MIND” Tomato Basil Pasta! - No Straining, just Stirring Throw it all in the pot, INCLUDING the uncooked Pasta, and cook! - Bring it to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. The starch leaches out of the pasta and makes a rich, warm sauce for the noodles. The other ingredients cook right along with the pasta Ingredients: 12 ounces pasta (Shown  Linguine) 1 can (15 ounces) diced tomatoes with liquid ( I used zesty red pepper flavor) 1 large sweet onion, cut in julienne strips 4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves 2 large sprigs basil, chopped 4 1/2 cups vegetable broth (regular broth and NOT low sodium) 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil Optional Parmesan cheese for garnish Directions: Place pasta, tomatoes, onion, garlic, basil, in a large stock pot. Pour in vegetable broth. Sprinkle on top the pepper flakes and oregano. Drizzle top with oil. Cover pot and bring to a boil. Reduce to a low simmer and keep covered and cook for about 10 minutes, stirring every 2 minutes or so. Cook until almost all liquid has evaporated – I left about an inch of liquid in the bottom of the pot – but you can reduce as desired . Season to taste with salt and pepper , stirring pasta several times to distribute the liquid in the bottom of the pot. Serve garnished with Parmesan cheese if desired.
Source: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=596567610375551&set=a.577027822329530.1073741826.100000669513646&type=1&theater

great Zeus’s beard this stuff is good. it’s also really easy and cheap and smells wonderful when it’s cooking. MAKE THE THING.

I’ve made this multiple times before and you should too

bethechangeyouwant:

little-audrey:

comfortspringstation:

Blow your MIND” Tomato Basil Pasta! - No Straining, just Stirring
Throw it all in the pot, INCLUDING the uncooked Pasta, and cook! - Bring it to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. The starch leaches out of the pasta and makes a rich, warm sauce for the noodles. The other ingredients cook right along with the pasta

Ingredients:
12 ounces pasta (Shown  Linguine)
1 can (15 ounces) diced tomatoes with liquid ( I used zesty red pepper flavor)
1 large sweet onion, cut in julienne strips
4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves
2 large sprigs basil, chopped
4 1/2 cups vegetable broth (regular broth and NOT low sodium)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Optional Parmesan cheese for garnish

Directions:
Place pasta, tomatoes, onion, garlic, basil, in a large stock pot. Pour in vegetable broth. Sprinkle on top the pepper flakes and oregano. Drizzle top with oil.
Cover pot and bring to a boil. Reduce to a low simmer and keep covered and cook for about 10 minutes, stirring every 2 minutes or so. Cook until almost all liquid has evaporated – I left about an inch of liquid in the bottom of the pot – but you can reduce as desired .
Season to taste with salt and pepper , stirring pasta several times to distribute the liquid in the bottom of the pot. Serve garnished with Parmesan cheese if desired.

Source: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=596567610375551&set=a.577027822329530.1073741826.100000669513646&type=1&theater

great Zeus’s beard this stuff is good. it’s also really easy and cheap and smells wonderful when it’s cooking. MAKE THE THING.

I’ve made this multiple times before and you should too

(via studyinginstilettos)

skunkbear:

Pangea with modern political borders (click to explore).
Recently, vox.com unearthed this awesome map of the ancient supercontinent (which originally made the rounds in 2012 and again in 2013), and their post included an interesting implied question: How removed would Americans feel from today’s Ebola epidemic if the world was arranged this way?
Credit: Massimo Pietrobon

skunkbear:

Pangea with modern political borders (click to explore).

Recently, vox.com unearthed this awesome map of the ancient supercontinent (which originally made the rounds in 2012 and again in 2013), and their post included an interesting implied question: How removed would Americans feel from today’s Ebola epidemic if the world was arranged this way?

Credit: Massimo Pietrobon

proofmathisbeautiful:

I’m not even kidding guys…I already ordered 2!
A Multi-Function Clip That Hides a Toolbox In Your Hair
Andrew Liszewski
A Leatherman multi-tool hanging off your belt is a great way to stay prepared for emergencies, but it means you look like someone with a Leatherman hanging off their belt—and that part’s not so great. This innocuous hair clip is a better alternative. It manages to replicate the functionality of quite a few tools, but will all but disappear when used to keep your bangs at bay.
It can serve as a flat-head screwdriver, even for fixing those tiny screws on your glasses. It’s got a 5/16 wrench for tackling the occasional bolt, and there’s a serrated edge for hacking through rope, but hopefully not hacking through your hair when worn. It could very well be the smallest multi-tool you can buy for just $10, trumped only by the Q-Tip when it comes to cost versus functionality.

proofmathisbeautiful:

I’m not even kidding guys…I already ordered 2!

A Multi-Function Clip That Hides a Toolbox In Your Hair

Andrew Liszewski

A Leatherman multi-tool hanging off your belt is a great way to stay prepared for emergencies, but it means you look like someone with a Leatherman hanging off their belt—and that part’s not so great. This innocuous hair clip is a better alternative. It manages to replicate the functionality of quite a few tools, but will all but disappear when used to keep your bangs at bay.

It can serve as a flat-head screwdriver, even for fixing those tiny screws on your glasses. It’s got a 5/16 wrench for tackling the occasional bolt, and there’s a serrated edge for hacking through rope, but hopefully not hacking through your hair when worn. It could very well be the smallest multi-tool you can buy for just $10, trumped only by the Q-Tip when it comes to cost versus functionality.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Reader tvargo writes:

First off… love your blog! I know very little about physics, but love reading about it. Could you potentially explain what the little upturned ends of wings do? looking on wikipedia is see this: “There are several types of wingtip devices, and although they function in different manners, the intended effect is always to reduce the aircraft’s drag by partial recovery of the tip vortex energy.” huh?

Thanks! That’s a great question. Winglets are very common, especially on commercial airliners. To understand what they do, it’s helpful to first think about a winglet-less airplane wing. Each section of the wing produces lift. For a uniform, infinite wing, the lift produced at each spanwise location would be the same. In reality, though, wings are finite and wingtip vortices at their ends distort the flow. The vortices’ upward flow around the ends of the wing reduces the lift produced at the wing’s outermost sections, making the finite wing less efficient (though obviously more practical) than an infinite wing.
Adding a winglet modifies the end conditions, both by redirecting the wingtip vortices away from the underside of the wing and by reducing the strength of the vortex. Both actions cause the winglet-equipped wing to produce more lift near the outboard ends than a wing without winglets. 
But why, you might ask, does the Wikipedia explanation talk about reducing drag? Since a finite wing produces less lift than an infinite one, finite wings must be flown at a higher angle of attack to produce equivalent lift. Increasing the angle of attack also increases drag on the wing. (If you’ve ever stuck a tilted hand out a car window at speed, then you’re familiar with this effect.) Because the winglet recovers some of the lift that would otherwise be lost, it allows the wing to be flown at a lower angle of attack, thereby reducing the drag. Thus, overall, adding winglets improves a wing’s efficiency. (Photo credit: C. Castro)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Reader tvargo writes:

First off… love your blog! I know very little about physics, but love reading about it. Could you potentially explain what the little upturned ends of wings do? looking on wikipedia is see this: “There are several types of wingtip devices, and although they function in different manners, the intended effect is always to reduce the aircraft’s drag by partial recovery of the tip vortex energy.” huh?

Thanks! That’s a great question. Winglets are very common, especially on commercial airliners. To understand what they do, it’s helpful to first think about a winglet-less airplane wing. Each section of the wing produces lift. For a uniform, infinite wing, the lift produced at each spanwise location would be the same. In reality, though, wings are finite and wingtip vortices at their ends distort the flow. The vortices’ upward flow around the ends of the wing reduces the lift produced at the wing’s outermost sections, making the finite wing less efficient (though obviously more practical) than an infinite wing.

Adding a winglet modifies the end conditions, both by redirecting the wingtip vortices away from the underside of the wing and by reducing the strength of the vortex. Both actions cause the winglet-equipped wing to produce more lift near the outboard ends than a wing without winglets. 

But why, you might ask, does the Wikipedia explanation talk about reducing drag? Since a finite wing produces less lift than an infinite one, finite wings must be flown at a higher angle of attack to produce equivalent lift. Increasing the angle of attack also increases drag on the wing. (If you’ve ever stuck a tilted hand out a car window at speed, then you’re familiar with this effect.) Because the winglet recovers some of the lift that would otherwise be lost, it allows the wing to be flown at a lower angle of attack, thereby reducing the drag. Thus, overall, adding winglets improves a wing’s efficiency. (Photo credit: C. Castro)

"Being brave doesn’t mean you aren’t scared. Being brave means you are scared, really scared, badly scared, and you do the right thing anyway"

Neil Gaiman, Coraline  (via 5000letters)

(Source: humingyay, via shewalksinmydreams)